Cycling Chics are Not Boys with Boobs

You would think that it’s obvious – women are not physically the same as men. However, during my cycling career I have noticed an appalling lack of female-focused training programs, diet plans, competitive athlete information, or even decent saddles.

For example: my favorite saddle originated from the need to protect a man’s reproductive bits. Not that reproduction isn’t important, but no one said: “Gee, there’s more women cyclist these days, let’s design a women-specific saddle”. Nope. Not much of that. Almost every ‘women-specific’ saddle you see on the market originated from a male-specific design and someone in marketing thought – “yeah, maybe that’ll work for a woman”. So, they slapped a pink logo on it and charge you $10 more.

silly saddle

Don’t get me wrong, the acceptance of competitive women in the cycling world has come a long way over the years. But, like so many other female sports, it is still woefully under-developed. Therefore, my purpose is to provide a forum by which serious cycling chics like myself can find (hopefully) valuable information to help them through our mutual love of cycling.

To digress, before I started this blog I searched everywhere for a good female-specific cycling blog / information / book – anything! Honestly, there really isn’t much out there. Occasionally you’ll get a decent article in Bicycling Magazine or on Active.com that has information for women in cycling, but it’s not a common occurrence.

Want a diet plan to get more competitive, a training regime to get faster / climb hills better / have more endurance, or understand what nutrition you should have on your bike ride? As a woman: most of the information you will find is probably a cobbled up version of a man’s plan unless you hire a coach that really knows their stuff.

Most of my diet regime, ride nutrition plan, training plans, riding form, race knowledge, clothing, and bike knowledge has come from years of being nosey and trying things to figure out what works. I’m no professional, a licensed nutritionist, or a doctor – but I might say something that helps other women cyclists and that, to me, makes all this worthwhile.

A lot of what I have to offer comes from experience, some very painful, embarrassing, or just forehead-slapping moments. It’s my wish that you, my fellow lady cyclist, will read something in my blogs that will help you avoid forehead-slapping and discomfort.

Read and Ride On!

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